Macbeth Quotes

By | 28.05.2022
Macbeth-quotes

The weird sisters, hand in hand,
Posters of the sea and land,
Thus do go about, about. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene III

When shall we three meet again
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
When the hurly burly ‘s done,
When the battle’s lost and won. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene I

Fair is foul, and foul is fair. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, The witches, Act 1, Scene 1

The best quotes from Macbeth. If you can look into the seeds of time,
And say which grain will grow and which will not. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Banquo, Act 1, Scene 3

By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

What bloody man is that? William Shakespeare, Macbeth, King Duncan, Macbeth, Act I, Scene II

I am in blood steepp’d in so far, that, should I wade no more, returning were as tedious as go o’er. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act III, Scene IV

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Sleep shall neither night nor day
Hang upon his pent-house lid. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Let fall thy blade on vulnerable crests; I bear a charmed life, which must not yield to one of woman born. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V, Scene VIII

Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 2, Scene 1

Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Shall he dwindle, peak, and pine. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

O gentle lady, ‘Tis not for you to hear what I can speak. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Macduff, Act 2, Scene 3

Or have we eaten on the insane root
That takes the reason prisoner? William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Banquo, Act 1, Scene 3

Double, double, toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble! William Shakespeare, Macbeth

I have supp’d full with horrors; direness, familiar to my slaughterous thoughts cannot once start me. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V, Scene V

False face must hide what the false heart doth know. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene VII

What! can the devil speak true? William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Banquo, Act 1, Scene 3

Life … is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

One fell swoop. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Macduff, Macbeth, Act IV, Scene III

What are these
So wither’d and so wild in their attire,
That look not like the inhabitants o’ the earth,
And yet are on ‘t? William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Yet do I fear thy nature
It is too full o’ th’ milk of human kindness
To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great,
Art not without ambition, but without
The illness should attend it. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 5

Present fears
Are less than horrible imaginings. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, King Duncan, Act 1, Scene 4

Wherefore could I not pronounce ‘Amen’?
I had most need of blessing, and ‘Amen’
Stuck in my throat. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene II

Give sorrow words; the grief that does not speak knits up the o-er wrought heart and bids it break. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

It was the owl that shrieked, the fatal bellman,
Which gives the stern’st good-night. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene II

I have no spur
To prick the sides only
Vaulting ambition, which overleaps itself
And falls on the other. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 7

There’s daggers in men’s smiles. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Donalbain, Act 2, Scene 3

Stands not within the prospect of belief. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

There’s no art
To find the mind’s construction in the face. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene IV

Out, damn’d spot! out, I say! William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 5, Scene 1

Double, double toil and trouble:
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Witches, Act 4, Scene 1

Here’s the smell of blood.
All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V, Scene I

What’s done cannot be undone. William Shakespeare, Macbeth quotes

Say, from whence
You owe this strange intelligence? or why
Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
With such prophetic greeting? William Shakespeare, Macbeth

It is too full o’ the milk of human kindness. William Shakespeare, Lady Macbeth, Act I, Scene V

Thou wouldst be great art not without ambition, but without the illness should attend it. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Who could refrain,
That had a heart to love, and in that heart
Courage to make love known? William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Screw your courage to the sticking-place. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene VII

Gainst nature still! Thriftless ambition, that will ravin up Thine own lives’ means! Then ’tis most like The sovereignty will fall upon Macbeth. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Macbeth shall never vanquished be until
Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane Hill
Shall come against him. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Third apparition, Act 4, Scene 1

I’ll make assurance double sure. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, Scene I

To be thus is nothing, but to be safely thus. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

A deed without a name. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Witches, Act 4, Scene 1

Two truths are told,
As happy prologues to the swelling act
Of the imperial theme. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

When our actions do not,
Our fears do make us traitors. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Lady Macduff, Act 4, Scene 2

Where shall we three meet again in thunder, lightning, or in rain? When the hurlyburly ‘s done, when the battle ‘s lost and won. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V, Scene V

Be bloody, bold, and resolute. Laugh to scorn the power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, Scene I

Two truths are told As happy prologues to the swelling act Of th’imperial theme. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Now does he feel his title
Hang loose about him, like a giant’s robe
Upon a dwarfish thief. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Angus, Act 5, Scene 2

I dare do all that may become a man;
Who dares do more, is none. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 7

Nothing is
But what is not. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 3

That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold:
What hath quenched them hath given me fire. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene II

My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical, Shakes so my single state of man That function is smother’d in surmise, and nothing is but what is not. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Tongue nor heart
Cannot conceive nor name thee! William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 2, Scene 3

If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

A falcon, towering in her pride of place,
Was by a mousing owl hawked at and killed. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene IV

The patient
Must minister to himself. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 5, Scene 3

Come what come may, time and the hour run through the roughest day. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 3

The patient
Must minister to himself. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V, Scene III

But that myself should be the root and father Of many kings. If there come truth from them (As upon thee, Macbeth, their speeches shine) Why, by the verities on thee made good, May they not be my oracles as well, And set me up in hope? But hush, no more. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

O, full of scorpions is my mind! William Shakespeare,, Macbeth, Act II, Scene II

Nothing in his life
Became him like the leaving it; he died
As one that had been studied in his death
To throw away the dearest thing he owed,
As ‘t were a careless trifle. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Receive what cheer you may. The night is long that never finds the day. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, Scene III

All causes shall give way: I am in blood
Stepp’d in so far that, should I wade no more,
Returning were as tedious as go o’er. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Nothing is
But what is not. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene III

For mine own good All causes shall give way. I am in blood Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o’er. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

More is thy due than more than all can pay. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

She should have died hereafter; There would have been a time for such a word. Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day To the last syllable of recorded time And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

If it were done when ’tis done, then ’twere well
It were done quickly. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 7

Confusion now hath made his masterpiece. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Things without all remedy
Should be without regard: What’s done is done. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act III, Scene II

Either thou, Macbeth, Or else my sword, with an unbattered edge, I sheathe again undeeded. There thou shouldst be; By this great clatter, one of greatest note Seems bruited. Let me find him, Fortune, And more I beg not. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

To prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition, which o’erleaps itself and falls on th’other. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 1, Scene 7

it provokes the desire, but it takes away the performance. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

What thou wouldst highly,
That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
And yet wouldst wrongly win. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

What’s done cannot be undone. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V, Scene I

My hands are of your color, but I shame to wear a heart so white. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Come to my woman’s breasts,
And take my milk for gall, you murdering ministers. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Angels are bright still, though the brightest fell;
Though all things foul would wear the brows of grace,
Yet grace must still look so. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, Scene III

All hail, Macbeth, thou shalt be king hereafter!… Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none. So all hail, Macbeth and Banquo! William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Thou sure and firm-set earth,
Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear
Thy very stones prate of my whereabout. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 2, Scene 1

Out, out brief candle, life is but a walking shadow…a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Your face, my thane, is as a book where men
May read strange matters. To beguile the time,
Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye,
Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower,
But be the serpent under ‘t. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene V

To know my deed, ’twere best not know myself. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene II

My plenteous joys, Wanton in fullness, seek to hide themselves In drops of sorrow.—Sons, kinsmen, thanes, And you whose places are the nearest, know We will establish our estate upon Our eldest, Malcolm, whom we name hereafter The Prince of Cumberland; which honor must Not unaccompanied invest him only, But signs of nobleness, like stars, shall shine On all deservers.—From hence to Inverness And bind us further to you. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood
Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather
The multitudinous seas incarnadine,
Making the green one red.
Methought I heard a voice cry, ‘Sleep no more!
Macbeth does murder sleep:  the innocent sleep,
Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care,
The death of each day’s life, sore labor’s bath,
Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course,
Chief nourisher in life’s feast. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 2, Scene 2

Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor?

Doctor: Not so sick, my lord, as she is troubled with thick-coming fancies that keep her from rest.

Macbeth: Cure her of that! Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, raze out the written troubles of the brain, and with some sweet oblivious antidote cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff which weighs upon her heart.

Doctor: Therein the patient must minister to himself. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

There’s husbandry in heaven; Their candles are all out. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene I

This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air
Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself
Unto our gentle senses. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood
Clean from my hand? William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene II

And though I could With barefaced power sweep him from my sight And bid my will avouch it, yet I must not, For certain friends that are both his and mine, Whose loves I may not drop, but wail his fall. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Things bad begun make strong themselves by ill. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 3, Scene 2

So fair and foul a day I have not seen. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

The heaven’s breath
Smells wooingly here: no jutty, frieze,
Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird
Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle:
Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed,
The air is delicate. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off. William Shakespeare, Macbeth

This is a sorry sight. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene II

Blood will have blood. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 3, Scene 4

The love that follows us sometime is our trouble, which still we thank as love. William Shakespeare, Macbeth quotes

If it were done when ’tis done, then ’twere well
It were done quickly: if the assassination
Could trammel up the consequence, and catch
With his surcease success; that but this blow
Might be the be-all and the end-all here,
But here, upon this bank and shoal of time,
We’d jump the life to come. But in these cases
We still have judgment here; that we but teach
Bloody instructions, which being taught, return
To plague the inventor: this even-handed justice
Commends the ingredients of our poisoned chalice
To our own lips. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene VII

I bear a charmed life. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act V, Scene VIII

The labor we delight in physics pain. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, Scene III

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