100+ Pride and Prejudice Quotes by Jane Austen

By | 21.07.2021
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I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library. Miss Caroline Bingley

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us. Mary Bennet

He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman’s daughter. So far we are equal. Jane Austen.

He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and everybody hoped that he would never come there again.

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. Jane Austen

What say you, Mary? for you are a young lady of deep reflection, I know, and read great books and make extracts.”
Mary wished to say something very sensible, but knew not how. Mr. Bennet & the narrator

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well.

To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love. Jane Austen

She is tolerable; but not handsome enough to tempt me; I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles, for you are wasting your time with me. Mr Darcy to Mr. Bingley about Elizabeth Bennet

Nothing is more deceitful…than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.

When she is secure of him, there will be leisure for falling in love as much as she chooses. Charlotte

Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then. It is something to think of, and it gives her a sort of distinction among her companions. Mr. Bennet

But I can assure you,” she added, “that Lizzy does not lose much by not suiting his fancy; for he is a most disagreeable, horrid man, not at all worth pleasing. So high and so conceited that there was no enduring him! He walked here, and he walked there, fancying himself so very great! Not handsome enough to dance with! I wish you had been there, my dear, to have given him one of your set-downs. I quite detest the man. Mrs. Bennet to Mr. Bennet about Mr. Darcy

I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.

Miss Bennet, I am shocked and astonished. I expected to find a more reasonable young woman. But do not deceive yourself into a belief that I will ever recede. I shall not go away till you have given me the assurance I require. Lady Catherine de Bourgh

For it gratified him, he said, to discover that Charlotte Lucas, whom he had been used to think tolerably sensible, was as foolish as his wife, and more foolish than his daughter! Mr. Bennet

A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.

Do anything rather than marry without affection. Jane Bennet

Nobody can tell what I suffer! — But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied. Mrs Bennet

Angry people are not always wise

There are very few who have heart enough to be really in love without encouragement. Charlotte Lucas

From the very beginning—from the first moment, I may almost say—of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish distain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of the disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world on whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry. Jane Austen.

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least. They always continue to grow sufficiently unlike afterwards to have their share of vexation; and it is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.”
“You make me laugh, Charlotte; but it is not sound. You know it is not sound, and that you would never act in this way yourself. Charlotte Lucas and Lizzy

They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects. Jane Austen

Do not give way to useless alarm…though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.

Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.

An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do. Mr Bennet

If my children are silly, I must hope to be always sensible of it… This is the only point, I flatter myself, on which we do not agree. I had hoped that our sentiments coincided in every particular, but I must so far differ from you as to think our two youngest daughters uncommonly foolish. Mr Bennet to his wife

In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels. Charlotte Lucas

When I am in the country, I never wish to leave it; and when I am in town it is pretty much the same. They each have their advantages, and I can be equally happy in either. Bingley

Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of both were overspread with the deepest blush. Jane Austen

Elizabeth, having rather expected to affront him, was amazed at his gallantry; but there was a mixture of sweetness and archness in her manner which made it difficult for her to affront anybody; and Darcy had never been so bewitched by any woman as he was by her. He really believed, that were it not for the inferiority of her connections, he should be in some danger.

It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us. Jane Bennet

But it is not merely this affair,” she continued, “on which my dislike is founded. Long before it had taken place my opinion of you was decided.

Pride is a very common failing… I am convinced that it is very common indeed; that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who do not cherish a feeling of self-complacency on the score of some quality or other, real or imaginary. Mary Bennet

You thought me then devoid of every proper feeling, I am sure you did. The turn of your countenance I shall never forget, as you said that I could not have addressed you in any possible way that would induce you to accept me

I can’t help thinking that at some point someone is going to produce a piglet and we’ll all have to chase it. Miss Bingley

I had not thought Mr. Darcy so bad as this—though I have never liked him. I had not thought so very ill of him. I had supposed him to be despising his fellow-creatures in general, but did not suspect him of descending to such malicious revenge, such injustice, such inhumanity as this.

They arise chiefly from what is passing of the time. And though I do sometimes amuse myself with arranging such little elegant compliments, I always wish to give them as unstudied an air as possible. Mr. Collins

It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy. I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples.

We are of each an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all of the eclat of a proverb.

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn? Mr Bennet

Mr. Wickham is blessed with such happy manners as may ensure his making friends—whether he may be equally capable of retaining them, is less certain.

there is nothing so bad as parting with one’s friends. One seems so forlorn without them.

That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long enough. Let the other young ladies have time to exhibit.

Resignation is never so perfect as when the blessing denied begins to lose somewhat of its value in our estimation. Mr Collins

Well, my comfort is, I am sure Jane will die of a broken heart, and then he will be sorry for what he has done. Mrs. Bennet

It will be no use to us if twenty such should come since you will not visit them. Mrs Bennet

Mrs. Bennet had no turn for economy; and her husband’s love of independence had alone prevented their exceeding their income.

Elizabeth Bennet Quotes

The distance is nothing when one has motive.

I remember hearing you once say, Mr. Darcy, that you hardly ever forgave, that your resentment once created was unappeasable. You are very cautious, I suppose, as to its being created.

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From the first moment I met you, your arrogance and conceit, your selfish disdain for the feelings of others, made me realize that you were the last man in the world I could ever be prevailed upon to marry.

If she is really headstrong and foolish, I know not whether she would altogether be a very desirable wife to a man in my situation, who naturally looks for happiness in the marriage state.

There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.

Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.

If a woman is partial to a man, and does not endeavor to conceal it, he must find it out.

I am happier even than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh. Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world that he can spare from me.

But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never. Elizabeth to Jane

I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine. Elizabeth about Darcy

I think you are in very great danger of making him as much in love with you as ever.

I like her appearance,” said Elizabeth, struck with other ideas. “She looks sickly and cross. Yes, she will do for him very well. She will make him a very proper wife.

She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.

The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.

Do not consider me now as an elegant female, intending to play you, but as a rational creature, speaking the truth from her heart.

You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.

You are perfectly right. You have employed your time much better. No one admitted to the privilege of hearing you can think anything wanting. We neither of us perform to strangers.

Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?

If a woman is partial to a man, and does not endeavour to conceal it, he must find it out. Elizabeth, about Bingley

You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.

I am determined that only the deepest love will induce me into matrimony. So, I shall end an old maid, and teach your ten children to embroider cushions and play their instruments very ill.

Are you too proud Mr. Darcy? And would you consider pride a fault or a virtue?

I am excessively diverted.

Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly….. till this moment I never knew myself.

She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes. It was an union that must have been to the advantage of both: by her ease and liveliness, his mind might have been softened, his manners improved; and from his judgement, information, and knowledge of the world, she must have received benefit of greater importance

I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.

They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.

I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice.

Affectation of candour is common enough—one meets with it everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design—to take the good of everybody’s character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad—belongs to you alone.

It’s a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness.

Have you any other objection than your belief of my indifference?

You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.

My dear, dear aunt,’ she rapturously cried, what delight! what felicity! You give me fresh life and vigour. Adieu to disappointment and spleen. What are men to rocks and mountains? Oh! what hours of transport we shall spend! And when we do return, it shall not be like other travellers, without being able to give one accurate idea of any thing. We will know where we have gone — we will recollect what we have seen. Lakes, mountains, and rivers shall not be jumbled together in our imaginations; nor, when we attempt to describe any particular scene, will we begin quarrelling about its relative situation. Let our first effusions be less insupportable than those of the generality of travellers.

Do you think that any consideration would tempt me to accept the man who has been the means of ruining, perhaps for ever, the happiness of a most beloved sister?

You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity, nor endeavour to persuade yourself or me, that selfishness is prudence, and insensibility of danger security for happiness

Really, Mr. Collins,” cried Elizabeth with some warmth, “you puzzle me exceedingly. If what I have hitherto said can appear to you in the form of encouragement, I know not how to express my refusal in such a way as to convince you of its being one.

One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.

And is this all?” cried Elizabeth. “I expected at least that the pigs were got into the garden, and here is nothing but Lady Catherine and her daughter…

When I consider,” she added, in a yet more agitated voice, “that I might have prevented it! — I who knew what he was. Had I but explained some part of it only — some part of what I learnt — to my own family! Had his character been known, this could not have happened. But it is all, all too late now.

You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner.

It is particularly incumbent on those who never change their opinion, to be secure of judging properly at first.

Mr. Darcy Quotes

My good opinion once lost, is lost forever.

Nothing is more deceitful,” said Darcy, “than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.

A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony, in a moment. Darcy to Miss Bingley

mr-darcy-quotes

Your conjecture is totally wrong, I assure you. My mind was more agreeably engaged. I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow. Darcy to Miss Bingley

You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.

In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil—a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.

In vain I have struggled. It will not do. My feelings will no longer be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

You expect me to account for opinions which you choose to call mine, but which I have never acknowledged.

Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride—where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.

I was given good principles, but left to follow them in pride and conceit.

Miss Bingley,” said he, “has given me more credit than can be. The wisest and the best of men — nay, the wisest and best of their actions — may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke

My object then,” replied Darcy, “was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill opinion, by letting you see that your reproofs had been attended to. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you

You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

My object then,” replied Darcy, “was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill opinion, by letting you see that your reproofs had been attended to. How soon any other wishes introduced themselves I can hardly tell, but I believe in about half an hour after I had seen you.

You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.

I am well enough acquainted with you, Miss Elizabeth, to know that I can not alarm you, even should I wish it.

She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.

But that was only when I first knew her, for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance.

All this she must possess,” added Darcy, “and to all this, she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.

I cannot fix on the hour, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.

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